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Guest Post- In the Kitchen with Jenny

My name is Jenny and my website is “In the Kitchen with Jenny.”   I met my husband in high school and we have been married for over 21 years.  We liveDSC02992a on dead end road on a farm just down the road from his family.  It’s a small community and I like that. We have two girls, Sarah, 17, and Jessica, 8.   When Sarah was just 4-1/2 months old she had a case of meningitis that left her with special needs. 13 years ago I became a stay at home mom to take care of her needs. They are both in school so now I use my time at home to do things for my family that I wouldn’t have time to if I had a job.  We raise a garden and I can some of our foods, milk goats and make cheese. I cook most of our meals as well as send the leftovers to school and work for lunches. 

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After drawing inspiration from the movie “Julie and Julia” and nudges from my friends I started the blog.  I provide step by step photos to help guide readers through a recipe.  I am a very visual person myself so I understand the need for visual cues.

 

 

My family lived in Germany (called West Germany at the time we were there in the late 70s) when my dad was in the Army.  My mom learned to cook quite a few German dishes.  This plate of schnitzel and jäger sauce is one of our favorites.  

 

Traditionally made with pork, and called Wiener-Schnitzel,  she was introduced to it as chicken once and that is how we always eat ours now. The name for the chicken version is Hänchen-Schnitzel but we just call it schnitzel. Served with the sauce it is called Jäger-Schnitzel and if you put a slice of cheese on it, Käse-Schnitzel.  Sometimes we do both sauce and cheese so I laughed and asked if we were technically eating Jäger-Käse-Hänchen-Schnitzel?  Maybe so, but we’ll keep it simple and say schnitzel and know that all will be available when served at our houses. 

 

 

Schnitzel and Jäger Sauce

For Jäger sauce:

One slice of bacon,cut up

8 ounce can of mushrooms, undrained

2 med onions, sliced thin

3-4 cups of water (or use beef broth and leave out bouillon cubes)

2 beef bouillon cubes

1 Tablespoon Kitchen Bouquet (aff link on Amazon)

cornstarch

 

For schnitzel:

boneless skinless chicken breasts (1 per person)

flour *

eggs, lightly beaten*

container bread crumbs*

canola oil

 

SPAETZLE Noodles recipe 

 

JÄGER SAUCE:

Add bacon to saucepan and cook until brown. Careful not to burn.

Add mushrooms with their juice, 

the sliced onions,

water, bouillon cubes (or beef broth) 

and lastly the Kitchen Bouquet.  

Boil until the onions are as soft as you like them.  Make a slurry out of cornstarch and water. Start with 2-3 tablespoons of cornstarch and enough water to make it runny.  Add, while stirring, to the pan a little at a time. It should thicken up quickly. You may not need it all or you may need to make more slurry.  Each batch is different.

SCHNITZEL:

Dump some flour in a shallow dish or paper plate.

Add beaten eggs to a shallow dish and add some bread crumbs to a separate shallow dish or dump onto large sheet of waxed paper.

Coat the chicken with flour.

Then coat the chicken in the eggs. 

Coat the chicken with the bread crumbs.  If you use the waxed paper you can use the paper to push the bread crumbs up on the chicken to keep your hands clean.

Coat all your chicken while heating the oil.  

The oil should be heated in a large skillet.  You should have enough oil to cover about half of the chicken when it is placed in the pan.  Maybe 1/2 to 1″.  You can test your oil by putting the end of a wooden spoon in your oil and it should bubble around it or if you are brave like me I sprinkle in a little bit of water and it bubbles.  Fry on one side until golden brown and then the other.  Approximately 3-4 minutes per side. 

Serve with spaetzle noodles.  Growing up I did not like the gravy as it was full of onions and mushrooms.  I ate my schnitzel with a drizzle of lemon juice which is another traditional way of enjoying in. 

 

* Start with 2-3 eggs for 6-8 pieces of chicken.  Flour and bread crumbs can be added to your dishes as you coat your chicken and find yourself running out.

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Joanne T Ferguson

Friday 9th of May 2014

G'day! Looks delicious Jenny! Great featured blog post!

Joanne/WineLady Cooks

Thursday 8th of May 2014

This looks delicious and really easier than I thought. I would love to make the Jager sauce. Thanks so much for sharing your recipe Jenny. Pinned/shared.

Jenny Casteel Unternahrer

Thursday 8th of May 2014

It is pretty simple Joanne. If you can turn on a stove you can make it!

[email protected]

Thursday 8th of May 2014

Looks amazing, and that Jäger sauce? Wow.

Jenny Casteel Unternahrer

Thursday 8th of May 2014

Thank you Janette! It sure makes the dish!

nettiemoore11

Thursday 8th of May 2014

I love Jagermesiter....what a fantastic idea making a sauce!

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